Category: Free Tutorials

Create Engaging User Experience –  Leveraging Eyetracking to Beat Competition

Create Engaging User Experience – Leveraging Eyetracking to Beat Competition

Eyetracking is a very powerful consumer research technique that can help you design engaging experience through effectively capturing user attention. On the other hand, it is an often misunderstood technique. Many are lured by the “sexiness” associated with heatmaps and glaze plots and misapplied the technique – getting lots of data but no actionable insight. Some avoid eyetracking altogether because of perceived complexity of the technique.

So, should we apply eyetracking or not?

If so, how to apply it the right way to improve user experience?

Here’s an eyetracking how-to guide of leveraging eyetracking to hep you create engaging user experience.

See how we can help you leverage eyetracking to attract users >>

 

Share
How to Conduct Lean UX Research -- Quickly Find Out What Your Users Need

How to Conduct Lean UX Research — Quickly Find Out What Your Users Need

Agile software development process gained tremendous popularity recently, adopted by many companies to deliver high-quality products through iterative launch and testing. In contrast to the traditional Water Fall model, in an Agile environment the design and development teams collaborate very closely and there is little step-by-step procedure or upfront planning – decisions are made and solutions are implemented on the fly, in a highly iterative and flexible manner.

So here are the questions:

Is UX research even needed any more in an Agile environment?

If so, then how do we conduct UX research in this context?

To find the answers, please read:

A How-to Guide of Lean UX Research

See how we can help you conduct agile user testing >>

 

Share
How to Develop New Products that People Really Want

How to Develop New Products that People Really Want

Developing new products and uncovering new markets always pose great challenges, because there’s no clear indication as to whether people would ever use them. That’s why it is particularly important to gather customer feedback to explore, validate, and improve the product vision and direction at a very early stage. However, we’ve seen many times entrepreneurs and product managers dived into UI design and coding without first evaluating the concept, the single most important step of customer validation.

Continue to read:

Developing Products that Customers Want – A Step-by-Step Guide

See how we can help you develop new products >>

Share
How to Conduct User Research to Improve Your Business

How to Conduct User Research to Improve Your Business

In helping product design professionals and business leaders to leverage user research, a powerful truth-finding tool, to make better business and design decisions, I will discuss user research best practices through the lens of driving business benefits.

Guided by business objectives

Whereas user research is a practice associated with User Centered Design, besides driving better user experience, it is also an instrument to improve business results. Therefore, researchers should always try hard to use business objectives, in addition to UX considerations, in guiding test planning and the interpretation of results.

For example, when determining the types of users to interview, in addition to thinking of the users that are most impacted by the product, we should also understand the business opportunities associated with the different user segments. This understanding can help us prioritize the user segments to recruit.

Share
How to Choose the Right User Research Methods

How to Choose the Right User Research Methods

Through investigating user needs and behavior, user experience research is critical in guiding our product strategy and design. There are many techniques leveraged by user researchers. Over the many years of working in the field, I have seen a persisting tendency of choosing research methods based on techniques and not business objectives.

For example, we often hear people saying things like “Why don’t we conduct an eyetracking study? It seems very exciting! For such a large re-design project, we can’t afford not doing it.” and “Let’s conduct a survey to learn about our client needs.” On the other hand, without a firm understanding of how the various research methods support the different types of business objectives, we would fail to drive business success through the methods.

I’ll give a brief account of commonly used research methods as aligned to business objectives. Please note that this is not a detailed description of the methods and their applications, which will be discussed in my future posts.

Share
Find Business Priorities by Understanding What Matter to Your Users

Find Business Priorities by Understanding What Matter to Your Users

Whereas user experience and usability have been used almost interchangeably in many occasions, through my conversations with many product-design professionals, I’ve found that “usability” is being increasingly used in a narrow context, in which it specifically refers to the ease of task completion and is closely associated with a “testing” connotation. On the other hand, “user experience” is used by practitioners in much broader contexts, referring to things ranging from ease of use to user engagement to visual appeal, and therefore I believe is a better term in capturing all the psychological and behavioral elements of user interactions with products.

Read my article published on UX Matters, More Than Usability: The Four Elements of User Experience, Part I for a detailed explanation.

See how we can help you identify business priorities through customer feedback >>

 

 

Share